Orientation 2014 Registration and
Freshman Course Preference Survey

ORIENTATION REGISTRATION

Please provide student registrant information:

* - Indicates Required Fields

*Last Name
*First Name
Middle Name    
Student ID    

Street Address    
Address (cont.)    
City    
State/Province
Zip Code
Home Phone:
*Cell Phone
*Email


Please choose the Orientation session you would like to attend:

Registration for Session 1: Monday, June 23 and Tuesday, June 24 - CLOSED.
Session 2: Wednesday, June 25 and Thursday, June 26
Session 3: Monday, June 30 and Tuesday, July 1 - CLOSED.

Will your parent(s) or guardian(s) be attending Orientation?

Please note that there is an attendance limit of 2 parents/guardians per registered student.

Please provide parent(s) registration information if they are attending:

First Name
Last Name
Email (If Available)
First Name
Last Name
Email (If Available)

Special Accomodations

If any registrant requires special accommodations (physical or dietary), please indicate that below:

FRESHMAN COURSE PREFERENCE SURVEY

*I will be living on campus
commuting to campus

Are you a student athlete?

Yes No

*Intended Major

Do you wish to pursue Teacher Education? Yes No

Are you interested in pursuing one of the following minors?
Theatre
Dance
Studio Art
Art History
Women's Studies
International Studies
Political Science
Writing
If you are undecided, please click on up to three fields you might be interested in exploring:
Accounting
Biochemistry
Biology
Business (joint degree B.S./M.B.A.)
Business Administration
Communication
Chemistry
Criminology and Justice
(joint degree B.A./M.A.)
Economics
Education
Education (joint degree B.A./M.S.)
English
Fine Arts
French Studies
History
Interdisciplinary Studies
Mathematics
Occupational Therapy
(joint degree B.S./M.S.)
Pharmacy
(joint degree B.A./Pharm.D.)
Philosophy
Physical Therapy
(joint degree B.S./D.P.M.)
Podriatic Medicine
(joint degree B.S./D.P.M.)
Psychology
Religious Studies
Social Work
(joint degree B.A./M.S.W.)
Sociology
Sociology
(joint degree B.A./M.A.)
Spanish
Visual Arts and Experimental Media

Freshman Seminar Preference

A Mount Education begins with a Freshman Seminar! Read through the course descriptions below and select your top three choices.
Sections fill fast and seats are offered on a first come first served basis, but we will do our best match you with your preferences.

FSEM 101
CAUGHT IN THE RYE: THE WORKS OF J. D. SALINGER

In this course, we will read and discuss some of Salinger's finest works, seeking to better understand what he had to tell us about love, loss, family, fame, alienation, art, and God. Works include Nine Stories, Franny and Zooey, and The Catcher in the Rye. If you choose, you’ll have the chance to write your own work of fiction.

FSEM 102
JUST WAR

War stories show us the impact of decisions to go to war and the demands of combat on behavior, through combatants’ actual experience of war. Soldiers embrace age-old ideals of warriors, yet face conflicts which expand beyond warfare. When is a war actually “just?” What is the moral and emotional impact of warfare if it violates such standards?

FSEM 103
WRITING NEW YORK

New York City has always been (and continues to be) a major site of literary and cultural production. We will explore New York cultural history and the relationship between literature and other artistic forms and media, and explore various spaces of literary and artistic culture in New York City today, through field trips and site visits.

FSEM 104
WHAT WILL YOU EXPLORE?

Did you know that taller women wear less makeup? Or that a person’s first memory of seeing a gun affects their attitudes on gun control? Did you know that women are more afraid of rats than men are, but they are not more afraid of roaches? These are just a few of the findings that students of this class produced. So... what do you want to explore? Through a project oriented, workshop style seminar, you will learn the research process from conception to measurement.

FSEM 105
PATRIOTS, HACKERS AND RADICALS: DISSENT IN AMERICA (HONORS ONLY)

The Hunger Games. The Pilgrims. Martin Luther King Jr. Oscar Zeta Acosta. Wikileaks. Anonymous. What do these texts, events, and people all have in common? One word: dissent. Dissent has been a crucial concept from the earliest American colonies until today. This class will grapple with the different manifestations of this seemingly quintessential American concept.

FSEM 107
UNDERSTANDING FREAKY AND FUN ECONOMICS

Discover the economic way of thinking and reasoning through Freakonomics and Super Freakonomics by Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner, and Naked Economics: Undressing the Dismal Science by Charles Wheelan. We will wrestle with interesting questions that are not usually asked in traditional textbooks in economics, but reflect real-life economic phenomena and problems that confront individuals and society. You will analyze, discuss, and debate these topics, evaluate critically their diverse perspectives, including how incentives affect the behavior of people when confronted with the economic issues of everyday life.

FSEM 108
SCIENCE OR PSEUDOSCIENCE?


Why do people believe weird things? You’ll learn to develop a healthy skepticism by learning to distinguish real science from pseudoscience, explore the psychological processes that make pseudoscience so appealing, and figure out for yourself whether the next weird thing is “too good to be true.”

FSEM 109
TRAVEL THE WORLD, DISCOVER YOURSELF

Take a tour, (figuratively and literally), through time and space across NYC and the world. Explore the journeys and journals of economists, scientists and poets to find and describe your place on earth. Go to the places you have dreamed about, discover places you never thought existed and return home to write the story of your own adventures. Experience how cultures are intertwined and knowledge of others requires self-understanding and a global point of view.

FSEM 110
FROM PORTRAIT TO SELFIE: VISUAL HISTORIES OF ME

It’s Saturday night, you’re looking fresh, you Instagram yourself. It’s Saturday night 1659, and Rembrandt van Rijn dabs his brush in oil paint as he puts the finishing touches on another self-portrait. Portraits, like selfies, communicate what it means to be human, as well as how people fashion identities. We investigate the genre of portraiture and learn to look and think critically about portrait images that we see and create everyday.

FSEM 111
VERSAILLES:
PALACE OF THE SUN

Discover the palace that served as the model for all great rulers - the Chateau of Versailles, creation of France's greatest monarch, Louis XIV, the Sun King. Learn about the stages and artistic/ political significance of its construction; its famous (and infamous) inhabitants; and how its story shaped the future of American, European and world history.

FSEM 112
FROM OPPRESSION TO OPPORTUNITY FOR WOMEN

In Half the Sky, NY Times editor Nicholas Kristof and his wife, Sheryl WuDunn, two fiercely moral voices, take us on a journey through Africa and Asia to meet extraordinary women struggling there because of human rights violations. Through this work, we will learn that the key to economic progress lies in unleashing women’s potential, not in accepting the sexual slavery of women.

FSEM 113
LOVE AMONG THE PEAR TREES: AUGUSTINE’S CONFESSIONS

Friends, temptations, relationships, parents, studying, worrying about the future, God, happiness. Sound familiar? These are the concerns of many college students. They were also the concerns of Augustine, a fourth century student, teacher, playboy, and finally, a bishop. As you get to know Augustine better, you will get to know yourselves better, and you too will be set on the path to discovering meaning and love.

FSEM 114
REEL CITIES: CINEMATIC URBAN EXPERIENCE

The real city and the reel city mirror each other in mutual representation. Can cinema help us understand urban issues and problems? Modernity links urban studies and cinema. The boundary between reel and real is blurred through different cities in films such as Blade Runner, Taxi Driver, The Truman Show, City of God, City of Ghosts, among many others.

FSEM 115
SURVIVAL SKILLS
FOR SCIENCE

Within the context of current topics in science, students will develop the skills they need to thrive as a science major. Students will learn skills for communicating scientific information, locating scholarly information, and handling quantitative information. The course will also include an exploration of career opportunities for science majors, and ethical behavior in science.

FSEM 116
PSYCHOLOGY OF TEACHING AND LEARNING

The demand for well-trained professionals in the field of Teacher Education has skyrocketed. This course introduces candidates to the cutting-edge strategies and techniques to help meet the academic, emotional, and social-behavioral needs of all students (from birth to age 21).

FSEM 117
SERVICE, LEARNING AN LEADERSHIP

Learn by doing and get out and serve! Students will focus on a variety of social issues throughout the city through direct hands-on service and academic exploration. Topics will range from volunteerism and philanthropy to non-profit management and ethics of service with field visits to human services, education, conservation, and human rights organizations.

Fall 2014 Core Course Preference Survey

Please respond to the following questions. Your answers will assist in your course placements in the
CORE curriculum at the College of Mount Saint Vincent.
We'll do our best to meet your preferences, but there is no guarantee that your preferences will be met.

Please select your preference from each of the following groups of courses:

Modern Languages and Literatures

Please respond to the questions below regarding your academic experience with foreign languages.
All students are required to take 6 credits (2 semesters) of a modern language other than English.

1. Did you study a language other than English in High School?

Yes No

What Language?    How Many Years?

Please note that students requesting evaluation of transfer credit through AP or IB, must submit the official transcript upon matriculation (enrollment as a student)
to the College of Mount Saint Vincent. After this time, transfer credit will not be granted.

2. Did you take the Advanced Placement (AP) Exam in a modern language other than English?

Yes No

If yes, in which language?

Specify your score in each AP category please submit an official copy of your scores by the beginning of the semester:

Language
Literature

3. Did you take the International Baccalaureate (IB*) Exam in a modern language other than English?

Yes No

If yes, in which language?

Specify your score in each IB category (please submit an official copy of your scores by the beginning of the semester).

Language
Literature

4. Do you speak a language other than English at home? 

Yes No

If yes, which one(s)?

Do you wish to study this language at the College of Mount Saint Vincent?

Yes No  

If Yes, you will be contacted by the College to set up an interview with a member of the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures.

5. Did you receive a Middle School or High School education in a language other than English in another country?

Yes No

If yes, where?

How many years of study? How old were you?

Do you wish to continue studying this language at an advanced level?

Yes No

If Yes, you will be contacted by the College to set up an Interview with a member of the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures.

6. Specify which language you wish to study at the College of Mount Saint Vincent (CMSV) for your one-year language requirement.
Please check one.

At the College of Mount Saint Vincent:
Filipino French Italian Spanish

Languages offered through Lehman College:
(please note that students will not begin these courses in their first semester)
Hebrew Japanese Latin Russian

Languages offered through Manhattan College:
(please note that students will not begin these courses in their first semester)
Arabic Chinese German Irish Japanese