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Integrated Courses (INTG)

The Integrated Courses fulfill Core Requirements for students who entered the college prior to August, 2012.  For a full Description of the Core Curriculum Requirements for Students who entered the college prior to August 2012, Please see the 2011-2012 college catalog. 

These courses emphasize the integration of two or more disciplines and encourage student growth, exploration of ethics and values, personal self-directed learning, and critical thinking.  Faculty and students are co-learners in the integration of the perspectives and the methodologies of these different disciplines.  Integrated courses offer numerous opportunities for writing and reflection, and explore the theme of values: ethical and spiritual.

One integrated course is required in the junior year and a second integrated course which explicitly involves Religious Studies is required in the senior year.  Should a student take an upper level Religious Studies elective from a pre-selected list, he or she may choose from any integrated course for the senior year. (Only for students who enrolled in the college prior to the fall of 2012.)

These courses are offered on a rotating basis and will be printed in the Fall and Spring schedules.
 

Junior Level | Senior Level


Junior Level 
INTG 303 THE HUDSON RIVER
This course focuses on environmental ethics through the study of the Hudson River. The ecology and history of the river will be explored in light of the effects and implications of human activity. Students will have an opportunity to research solutions for the future of the river and develop an awareness of the problems involved in reconciling economic and social demands with ecological balance (3 credits).

INTG 306 ALTERNATIVE FUTURES
This course will examine selected models projected by leading futurists and discuss key areas of future development, e.g., ecology, family life, religion, science and medicine, communication. Emphasis is placed on the importance of informed, ethically-based choices in the present to insure an equitable and rewarding society in the future (3 credits).

INTG 310 LEGACIES: FAMILY STRUCTURES AND FUNCTIONS
This course will explore variations in family structures, underlying dynamics and functions, focusing primarily upon American families. The families of various ethnic groups will be analyzed from the integrated, interdisciplinary perspectives of history, sociology, and psychology. Students will conduct a psychosocial analysis of historical changes in their families (3 credits).  

INTG 312 GENDER IN AMERICA: PAST, PRESENT, FUTURE
Gender, the different understandings of masculinity and femininity, has both been affected by and has affected history. This course will examine the roles played by gender in 20th century America, looking in particular at issues of foreign policy, social policy, immigration, and class conflict (3 credits).  

INTG 318 WOMEN’S LIVES, WOMEN’S VOICES
This course will focus on the lives of selected women who have made contributions in the arts and sciences. Students will identify the obstacles which these women encountered and the methods they employed for successful achievement in their respective disciplines. Students will be introduced to contemporary women’s issues and to the responses of contemporary feminist research (3 credits).

INTG 321 HEROES AND HEROINES: A LEGACY OF LEADERSHIP
This course will focus on different styles of leadership and the dimensions of leadership from the integrated perspectives of sociology, history, and nursing. Leadership as related to values, mentorship, and philanthropy will be investigated. Students will have the opportunity to put their classroom learning and experience into practice by volunteering their services at a local community service agency (3 credits).

INTG 325 A NATION OF IMMIGRANTS
This course will cover United States immigration from Colonial times to the present with particular emphasis on the factors which determine migration. It will focus on the theories of immigration and on such related topics as nativism, Americanization, family structure, legislation, and the contributions of immigrants to American life (3 credits).

INTG 327 ETHICS IN HEALTH CARE
This course is designed to encourage students to reflect critically on ethical issues in contemporary health care as these issues affect providers and consumers. A study of major philosophical ethical theories will provide tools for the analysis of concrete cases. Identification of values and the use of reasoned arguments in which students justify their ethical positions will be emphasized (3 credits).

INTG 328 GLOBAL CHALLENGES
This course will analyze the most important issues challenging today’s world, e.g., globalization, growth in the developing world, environmental concerns, and political changes. The disciplines of history, economics, and ethics will be used to explain these key issues. The pervading theme will be:“How can the world of the third millennium be a more provident, peaceful one for all people?” (WE) 3 credits

INTG 333 CONTEMPORARY HISTORY THROUGH FILM
Selected fiction and documentary films portraying socio-historical conditions in America and Europe, viewed and analyzed from cinematic, historical, and ethical perspectives encompassing selected twentieth century topics (3 credits).

INTG 346 BUSINESS ETHICS
This course is designed to aid students in developing criteria for handling ethical problems in business, to sharpen student awareness of the varied ethical issues that surface in business, and to help students (especially through case studies) to apply moral reasoning to some of these problems. Although Philosophy and Business are the primary disciplines around which the course is structured, the disciplines of psychology, religious studies, communications, economics, and law will also be brought into class lectures and discussions. (WE) 3 credits

INTG 350 EPIDEMICS IN HUMAN HISTORY
The role of infectious diseases in human history is examined with emphasis on historical, socio-cultural, and environmental factors that lead to the emergence of epidemics, as well as social and scientific advancements that contribute to their abatement (3 credits).

INTG 355 GENOMES, EVOLUTION, AND HUMAN NATURE
The principles of heredity and the role of the genome in shaping the development, structure and function of the individual are examined. Human prehistory and the interrelationships of humans and other primates are delineated. Particular emphasis is given on the scientific, sociopolitical and ethical considerations arising from the decoding of the human genome and the applications of genomic technology (3 credits).

INTG 391 SPECIAL TOPICS IN INTEGRATED STUDIES
A special course offered by faculty members from two different areas of study. This course may address a question of special relevance to the time, take advantage of special faculty expertise, or may be a trial run of a developing course. As in all integrated courses, questions of values: ethical and spiritual will be addressed (3 credit).

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Senior Level
INTG 402 THE HUMAN CONDITION
This course examines selected contemporary issues, particularly those affected by the technological revolution. Questions such as genetic engineering and world hunger will be viewed from the perspective of ethics, literature and psychology. The definition of complex moral issues and the need for responsible decision making will be emphasized (3 credits).

INTG 403 WOMEN AND RELIGION
This course introduces students to contemporary women's scholarship as seen in theology and English literature. It explores different views of "femininity," clarifies values of personal identity and social justice, identifies the barriers to achievement faced by women, and explores the role of religion and spirituality in women's lives (3 credits).

INTG 404 ALTERNATIVE HEALING
A critical exploration of alternative modalities of healing that transcend the boundaries of conventional physical medicine, especially within the context of religious belief. The topics range from classic “faith-healing to psychosomatic dynamics to the “vibrational medicine” of Richard Gerber (3 credits).

INTG 405 GENOCIDE
An examination of genocide, focusing on its religious dimensions and shared socio-psychological processes. The course begins with an in-depth analysis of questions like the nature and psychology of evil and socio-psychological processes leading to the construction of a template from which to study the various genocides that have occurred throughout history, such as the Armenian Genocide of 1915, the Holocaust, the massacres in Rwanda of 1994, and the present tragedy of Darfur (3 credits).

INTG 406 DEATH
An examination of the various aspects of death, with particular emphasis upon their relationship to religion and their expression in notable works of literature. Topics include the definition of death; the psychology of dying and grief; moral issues such as euthanasia; and the hope of, ideas about, and evidence for life after death (3 credits).  

INTG 408 PSYCHE AND SPIRIT
This course is an integrated inquiry into the nature, dynamics, and paranormal dimensions of the human mind and spirit. Special attention will be paid to the contributions of both the great psychologists - from Psychoanalysis to Existentialism – and to the great spiritual masters from a variety of religious traditions – ancient Buddhism to modern Catholicism (3 credits).

INTG 420 SEXUALITY, THE INDIVIDUAL, AND SOCIETY
This course will explore human sexuality using a cross-cultural, social learning, and developmental perspective. Issues relevant to the development of sexuality will be explored through the disciplines of psychology, health, sociology, anthropology, history, fine arts, literature and religion (3 credits).  

INTG 425 SCIENCE AND RELIGION
An examination of the historical and contemporary relationship between science and religion in terms of a critical comparison and contrast of their respective methodologies and truth claims. Historic cases of the clash between the two (e.g., Galileo and Darwin) will be used as vehicles for this study which will also emphasize implications for the student’s personal value system (3 credits).

INTG 430 RELIGION AND SOCIOLOGY: MAKING SENSE OF INEQUALITY
An exploration of poverty and inequality on a national and global level, bringing together religious and sociological perspectives to examine inequality’s causes as well as potential solutions (3 credits).  

INTG 445 BIOETHICS
This course will emphasize the ethical and social problems inherent in recent advances in cell biology, reproductive technologies, medicine, population control, allocation of resources, and the social and political role of scientists. Responsible, ethical decision-making will be emphasized in the consideration of these issues (3 credits).

INTG 491 SPECIAL TOPICS IN INTEGRATED STUDIES
A special course offered by faculty members from two different areas of study, one of which must be religious studies. This course may address a question of special relevance to the time, take advantage of special faculty expertise, or may be a trial run of a developing course. As in all integrated courses, questions of values: ethical and spiritual will be addressed (3 credits).  

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