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Course Descriptions

Students select courses from the Foundation Courses, Major Content Areas, and Psychology Electives based on requirements for their specific degree.

Foundation Courses
    PSYC 103 Introduction to Psychology I
    PSYC 104 Introduction to Psychology II
    PSYC 205 Psychological Statistics
    PSYC 315 Research Methods I
    PSYC 405 Advanced Research Methods
    PSYC 450 Capstone Seminar
Major Content Areas
    Biological
        PSYC 432 Motivation and Emotion
        PSYC 435 Physiological Psychology
    Clinical
        PSYC 302 Psychological Testing
        PSYC 327 Interviewing and Counseling
        PSYC 355 Abnormal Psychology
        PSYC 437 Contemporary Psychotherapy
    Developmental
        PSYC 320 Psychology of Adulthood and Aging
        PSYC 345 Psychology of Childhood
        PSYC 346 Psychology of Adolescence
    Cognitive
        PSYC 324 Learning and Memory
        PSYC 424 Cognition
    Social
        PSYC 321 Social Psychology
        PSYC 347 Personality
        PSYC 352 Multicultural Psychology
Psychology Electives
    PSYC 216 Behavior Modification
    PSYC 220 Psychology of Family Relations
    PSYC 240 Psychology of Women
    PSYC 251 Psychology of Delinquent & Criminal Behavior
    PSYC 302 Psychological Testing
    PSYC 330 Special Topics
    PSYC 341 Health and Stress
    PSYC 344 Group Dynamics
    PSYC 360, 460 Independent Study
    PSYC 373 Industrial Psychology
    PSYC 374 Organizational Psychology
    PSYC 329, 430 Research in Psychology I and II
    PSYC 375, 475 Internship I and II

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Psychology (PSYC) 
100-200 Level Courses

PSYC 103 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY I (C)*
This course provides students with a fundamental grasp of the research, principles, and theories of psychology. Students will acquire a better understanding of their behavior through such topics as development, learning, memory, personality, social behavior, abnormal behavior and therapy (3 credits). 
PSYC 103 is a prerequisite for PSYC 104, PSYC 205 and all 300 level psychology courses except PSYC 319, PSYC 320, PSYC 345, PSYC 346, PSYC 321. 
 
PSYC 104 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY II
This course provides students with a fundamental grasp of the application of the scientific method to the study of psychology. Topics include: research methodology, biological bases of animal and human behavior, sensation and perception, motivation, intelligence, and problem-solving (3 credits).

PSYC 205 PSYCHOLOGICAL STATISTICS
In this course, students will apply descriptive and inferential statistics to Psychological research. Topics include: measures of central tendency and variability, correlation and regression, students t-test, and analysis of variance. Statistical computer packages will be used for data analysis (3 credits).
 
PSYC 216 BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION
A survey of the research, principles, and techniques of operant and classical conditioning as applied to selected problems of behavior (3 credits).
 
PSYC 220 PSYCHOLOGY OF FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS
The focus of this course is on the study of love, intimacy, and commitment in traditional and non-traditional families. Topics include: friendship, dating, communication, sexuality, decisions on parenting and violence and coming apart (3 credits).

PSYC 240 PSYCHOLOGY OF WOMEN
An introduction to the psychology of women, surveying psychological, social, and biological determinants of behavior (3 credits).

PSYC 251 PSYCHOLOGY OF DELINQUENT AND CRIMINAL BEHAVIOR
This course is a survey of psychosocial causes of criminal behavior. Topics include: the antisocial personality, drug abuse, neuropsychological components of criminality, and the critical evaluation of detection methods (3 credits).
 
PSYC 302 PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTING
This course surveys the various tests available to psychologists, including intelligence, achievement, aptitude, and personality tests. The student is not trained for clinical interpretations (3 credits). 
Prerequisite: PSYC 205  

PSYC 315 RESEARCH METHODS I (WE)*
This course examines the application of the scientific method to psychology, focusing on such methods as surveys, simple experiments and complex experiments. Laboratory work, library research, and writing of research reports are required (3 credits). 
Prerequisites: PSYC 104 and PSYC 205  

PSYC 319 CHILDHOOD AND ADOLESCENCE
This course surveys the physical, emotional, social, and intellectual development of the person from conception through adolescence. The essential research and theories explaining the development of language, conceptual skills, interpersonal skills, and personality will be discussed and evaluated. This course may not be taken by psychology majors (3 credits).

PSYC 320 ADULTHOOD AND AGING
This course examines the physical, social, emotional, and intellectual alterations occurring in adulthood and old age. The fundamental research and theories explaining the stages and developmental tasks of adulthood will be described and evaluated (3 credits).
 
PSYC 321 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY
This course studies the processes by which the behaviors, thoughts, and feelings of the individual are influenced by his/her social environment. Topics include: social perception and attribution, attitude development and change, interpersonal attraction and interpersonal relations, such as friendship, aggression, and prosocial behavior (3 credits).
 
PSYC 324 LEARNING AND MEMORY
The first part of this course covers essential theories of learning, focusing on the principles of classical conditioning, operant conditioning and cognitive theories of learning. Memory processes of encoding, storage, and retrieval and memory distortions and failures are covered in the second half of the course (3 credits).
 
PSYC 326 LIFESPAN DEVELOPMENT
This course explores the major milestones of development across the human life-span, theories that explain these developments, and individual differences in human development from the psycho-bio-social perspective. The course emphasizes how this content relates to working with individuals in health care settings. This course is exclusively for Nursing Majors (3 credits).
 
PSYC 327 PRINCIPLES AND TECHNIQUES OF INTERVIEWING AND COUNSELING
This course explores the techniques for establishing a stable working relationship with a client and examines prominent contemporary approaches to interviewing and counseling from theoretical and practical standpoints (3 credits).

PSYC 329-429 RESEARCH IN PSYCHOLOGY
Supervised participation in research design, data collection, statistical analysis, and interpretation of results in conjunction with ongoing research projects in psychology. Students must complete an application and obtain permission of the faculty mentor before registration. Students may register for one or two semesters (3 credits each). 

PSYC 330 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY
This course explores new course offerings in any area of psychology. Topics are listed in the registration book. Descriptions of specific topics are posted in the psychology department. Specific requirements will depend on topic (3 credits).

PSYC 341 PSYCHOLOGY OF HEALTH AND STRESS
This course focuses on the psychological processes that affect health with a focus on stress and stress management. Topics include: psychological analysis of health promoting and health compromising behaviors and psychobiological perspectives on stress, pain management, chronic illness, and terminal illness (3 credits).
 
PSYC 344 GROUP DYNAMICS
This course is an introduction to small group processes, including theory, research and application. Topics include leadership, power, decision-making, and conflict (3 credits).
 
PSYC 345 PSYCHOLOGY OF CHILDHOOD
This course is the study of the physical, mental, emotional, and social development of the child from conception to adolescence. Topics include: factors affecting prenatal development, sensation and perception, cognition, personality, and social development. Students who have taken PSYC 319 may not take PSYC 345 (3 credits).
 
PSYC 346 PSYCHOLOGY OF ADOLESCENCE
This course is the study of the physical, mental, emotional, and social development of the adolescent. Students who have taken PSYC 319 may not take PSYC 346 (3 credits). 

PSYC 347 PERSONALITY
An examination of the research and theories explaining the development of personality and its functioning (3 credits).

PSYC 352 MULTICULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY
This course introduces students to current theories and research methods that drive the emerging field of multicultural psychology. Emphasis is placed on practical applications of multicultural psychology as it pertains to diverse groups living in the United States. The course, explores the meaning of multicultural psychology, critiques mainstream American psychology’s methods and theoretical base in the context of alternative frameworks, and reviews current research and practice related to diverse human experiences (3 credits).
 
PSYC 355 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY
This course surveys a variety of psychological disorders ranging from anxiety to depression and schizophrenia. Current theories regarding their causes are discussed and compared. Approaches to treating the disorders are also covered with particular emphasis on the psychotherapies and associated behavioral techniques (3 credits).

PSYC 360, 460 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN PSYCHOLOGY
This course is designed to allow psychology majors to pursue an area of special interest in psychology. Students must present a preparatory outline to qualify. Permission of the faculty mentor is required at the time of registration (3 credits each).
 
PSYC 373 INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY
This course involves the application of psychological principles and methods to the study of individuals and groups in the workplace. Topics include: personnel selection, placement and evaluation, training and development, and human factors engineering (3 credits).
 
PSYC 374 ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY
This is an analysis of human behavior in organizations. Topics include: organizational structures and dynamics, motivation and job satisfaction, management styles, and problems in human relations (3 credits).
 
PSYC 375, 475 INTERNSHIP
The internship provides students with the opportunity to explore the ways in which psychologists function in various institutional settings. Students are required to sign a contract which specifies the number of hours or days that will be spent in the institution, the responsibilities that must be fulfilled, and the project that must be completed. The contract is signed by the supervisor, the faculty member, and the internship coordinator at the time of registration (3 credits each) 
Psychology 315 is a prerequisite for all 400 level Psychology courses.

PSYC 405 ADVANCED RESEARCH METHODS
This course involves the examination of research techniques, methodological issues and recent theoretical models in one area of Psychology. Field and laboratory studies will be designed, implemented, and reported. (WE) This course is offered once every 2 years. (3 credits).
 
PSYC 424 COGNITION
This course surveys operations of the mind as viewed from the information processing perspective. The focus is on experimental cognitive psychology with additional attention given to research in neuropsychology that connects cognitive theories to brain processes. Attention, perception, the representation of knowledge, problem solving, reasoning, and language are studied (3 credits).
 
PSYC 432 MOTIVATION AND EMOTION
This course explores human motivation and its interactions with emotions, surveying the research and theories of motivational states such as hunger, sex, affiliation, achievement, and of emotions such as happiness, fear, and anger (3 credits).
 
PSYC 435 PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY
This course analyzes biological factors underlying behavior with emphasis on anatomy and functions of the nervous system. Topics include: behavioral genetics and the neurophysiological substrates of learning, motivation, and abnormal behavior (3 credits).
 
PSYC 437 CONTEMPORARY PSYCHOTHERAPY
Contemporary forms of psychotherapy, including psychoanalysis, behaviorism, Gestalt, and humanistic therapies, are discussed and critically evaluated (3 credits).
 
PSYC 450 CAPSTONE SEMINAR
In this capstone experience, students will integrate and apply skills and knowledge acquired as a Psychology major. Students will explore their own interests in psychology using self-directed learning. This will include reading and discussing journal articles, and completing an independent project in which they apply their knowledge to an existing controversy, social problem or research question (3 credits).

(C)* May be taken to meet Core Requirements
(WE)* Writing Emphasis

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