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Course Descriptions

HIST 201 NATURAL RIGHTS, CIVIL RIGHTS AND HUMAN RIGHTS (C)*
This course examines major themes in the development of natural rights, civil rights and human rights. These topics include natural law theory; conflicts between individual rights and state authority; the moral and philosophical origins of human rights; Western, American, and International interpretations of human rights; the Bill of Rights; the Civil Rights Movement; the Universal Declaration of Human Rights; case studies in women’s rights; and relevant U.S. Supreme Court decisions (3 credits). 

HIST 202 ROYALTIES AND REVOLUTIONS: PRE-MODERN TO THE MODERN WORLDS (C)*
This course explores the transition from the pre-modern era to the modern world through the history of France, from seventeenth-century Absolutism through the Age of Enlightenment to the French Revolution. Topics include the cultural and political machinery of the Versailles monarchy; the increasingly vocal critiques of that system, from Voltaire to the Philosophes; and the outbreak, course and aftermath of the French Revolution (1789-1815), which 129 gave birth to modern political discourse (3 credits).

HIST 203 WITCHES, SLAVES, AND REBELS: INEQUALITY IN EARLY AMERICA (C)*
Inequality – due to race, class, gender, nationality, and many other factors – was a defining feature of life in colonial North America. This course will examine how inequality shaped people’s lives in colonial North America, focusing particularly on questions of the changing relationship of Native Americans with different European colonists, the formation of new understandings of race and class, early American patterns of slavery and servitude, and the Salem witch trials (3 credits). 

HIST 214 THE SHAPING OF THE MODERN WORLD (C)*
A study through the use of primary sources of the major developments in world history since the Renaissance that have influenced the modern world (3 credits). 

HIST 300 CLASSICAL CIVILIZATIONS
A study of the political, economic, social, and cultural development of the Near East and Mediterranean World from earliest times to the end of the fifth century A.D. (3 credits). 

HIST 301 MEDIEVAL HISTORY
This course covers the late Roman Empire and its devolution in the West; early Christianity; the division of the Roman legacy in the East and in the West; Manorialism; the Carolingian Revival and Feudalism; the rise of Islam; relations between the Greek East and the Latin West; the Crusades; the cultural and intellectual achievements of the Medieval West (3 credits). 

HIST 302 EASTERN ROMAN EMPIRE
The Christianization of the Roman Empire and the transfer of its capital to Constantinople gave rise to a powerful and stable Eastern Roman Empire lasting a thousand years after the collapse of the Empire in the West. This course is an inquiry into the reasons for its stability and longevity. It also attempts to explain why the Eastern Roman Empire declined and was finally conquered by the Ottoman Turks. Emphasis is given to the Eastern Empire’s disastrous relations with the Latin West during the Crusades asthe chief reason for its decline and fall. Thus, this course offers a way to understand the heritage of the ancient world as well as the origins of some of the current ethnic, political and religious problems still facing Greece, Turkey, the Balkans and Russia (3 credits). 

HIST 309 U.S.: COLONIES TO THE CIVIL WAR
In this course we explore the first half of American history. Emphasis will be on encounters between Native Americans and European settlers; the complex and uneven development of democracy in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries; the creation of new relations of race, class, and gender in the new republic; and the crises leading to the Civil War (3 credits). 

HIST 310 U.S.: CIVIL WAR TO THE PRESENT
An overview of the major developments in American life since the Civil War, including the changing role of the federal government in the daily lives; the roles played by race, class, and gender in American history; the ways in which international developments affected life in America; and the relationships between cultural, political, and social historical developments in American life (3 credits).

HIST 315 COLONIAL LATIN AMERICA
This course traces the history of colonial Latin America from its Native American and Iberian roots to independence. Focus will be placed on the social, economic, cultural and religious developments from the period that influenced the formation of modern Latin America (3 credits). 

HIST 317 MODERN LATIN AMERICA IN THE NINETEENTH AND TWENTIETH CENTURIES
This course traces the history of the nations of modern Latin America from the wars of independence in the early nineteenth century to the present day. Focus will be placed on the social, economic, and political developments that have contributed to the shaping of Latin American culture and society (3 credits). 

HIST 318 MODERN CARIBBEAN: BETWEEN REVOLUTION AND DICTATORSHIP
This course traces the history of the modern Caribbean from 1789 to the present. Special focus is placed on the revolutionary upheavals and dictatorial regimes in Haiti, Cuba, and the Dominican Republic. Other themes include United States involvement in the region, sugar and tobacco monoculture, slavery and its abolition, decolonization, and post-colonial discourse (3 credits).

HIST 320 AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY, 1600-1865
This course explores the history of African American life from the beginnings of slavery to the end of the Civil War. Topics covered include slavery, the development of racial identity, and African American roles in the American Revolution and the Civil War (3 credits).  

HIST 321 AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY, 1865-2012
This course explores the history of African American life from the end of slavery to the present. Topics covered include the ways in which events such as Reconstruction, the rise and fall of Jim Crow, the two World Wars, the Cold War, the Civil Rights movement, and the and Black Power movement have affected African American life (3 credits).

HIST 330 COLONIALISM IN AFRICA AND ASIA
This course provides an overview of major thematic topics in the history of the European colonial system in Africa and Asia. Thematic topics include: the ideological motivations for imperialism; the impact of the colonial system on the colonizer as well as the colonized; nationalism and anti-colonial resistance; decolonization; and colonialism’s legacy in present-day Africa and Asia (3 credits). 

HIST 333 MODERN ASIA
The transformation of the traditional values and institutions of China, Japan and India as a result of their encounter with the West; reform and revolution; their international position (3 credits). 

HIST 341 U.S.: RECONSTRUCTION TO THE PROGRESSIVE ERA
American history from the end of the Civil War until World War I. Examines such topics as Reconstruction, the Gilded Age, the settling of the western frontier, labor relations, immigration, and Progressive reform (3 credits). 

HIST 346 U.S.: AMERICA FROM THE ROARING TWENTIES TO WORLD WAR II
American history from the 1920s to the 1940s. Explores the rise of consumer culture; debates about the benefits and drawbacks of “modern” life in the 1920s; how the Great Depression and the New Deal changed American life; and the ways in which World War II affected America's role in world politics as well as life on the home front (3 credits). 

HIST 349 MODERN AFRICA
Focus on Africa’s colonial background; slavery; the rise of nationalism; the establishment of independent states; political and developmental challenges (3 credits). 

HIST 356 AMERICAN PRESIDENCY
This course focuses on the presidency from the time of the Constitutional Convention of 1787 to the Civil War. Emphasis will be on the men who have had the greatest impact on the Presidency. A chronological, biographical approach is used. An analysis of present-day government structures will also be carried out (3 credits). 

HIST 363 CONTEMPORARY MIDDLE EAST
A dynamic discussion of some of the most important issues affecting the Middle East today, including the roles and responsibilities of women; varieties of Islam; constitutional democracy versus authoritarian politics; youth culture versus established social traditions; economics and oil in the Persian Gulf; the status of Iraq, Iran, Afghanistan, and Pakistan; the Israeli-Palestinian dispute; the future of the United States and the United Nations in the region; Arab literature, poetry and film (3 credits). 

HIST 364 ISLAM AND POLITICS: FROM DEMOCRACY TO THEOCRACY TO ISLAMISM
This course investigates the interrelationship of Islam and various forms of government, from liberal democracy to theocracy to militant Islamism. It examines the historical evolution of Islamic politics; the wide range of Islamic manifestations of governance; Islamist ideologues such as Sayyid Qutb and Ayman al-Zawahiri; enlightened Muslim political philosophers, from Averroes in the Middle Ages to George Hourani, one of the founders of an Islamic theory of human rights; and, it proposes models for reconciling Islam with women’s rights and liberal democracy in the modern era (3 credits). 

HIST 365 AMERICA IN THE 1960s
Major concentration will be on national politics and foreign affairs from the J.F.K. Presidency through the early Nixon years; the Vietnam War; civil rights; women’s liberation’ student protest movements; the counterculture (3 credits). 

HIST 367 THE U.S. ROLE IN VIETNAM, 1940-1975
An examination of the root causes of American involvement in the war in Vietnam; the course of the conflict on the battlefield; its disruptive impact at home, including the anti-war movement on American campuses; its portrayal in American cinema; and the lingering effects of the war on the conduct of contemporary American foreign policy (3 credits). 

HIST 380 HISTORY OF THE CITY OF ROME
This course is part of the College of Mount Saint Vincent’s study abroad program in Rome, Italy. The course traces the history of the city of Rome from its ancient origins to the present, situating Rome in the broader context of the development European civilization and the creation of modern Italy. The majority of lectures will be conducted on-site at key museums, monuments, and churches within the city of Rome (3 credits).       

HIST 400 EUROPE, 1550-1700: POLITICS AND SOCIETY IN EARLY MODERN EUROPE
An examination of the development of the religious, political, economic, social and cultural foundations of early modern Europe, including the Renaissance; the Reformation; Wars of Religion; the age of Absolutism; dynastic conflict; the beginnings of constitutionalism; and the European Enlightenment (3 credits).  

HIST 405 THE TUDOR REFORMATIONS
Tudor England (from the accession of Henry VIII in 1509 to the death of Elizabeth I in 1603) and the religious revolution it underwent still engage the modern mind and imagination with its complex, violent and dramatic story. It is marked by the achievements as well as excesses of Henry VIII, and the distinctive way the Protestant Reformation occurred in England; brief attempts at further Protestantization under Edward VI and the subsequent Counter-Reformation under Bloody Mary;  and a relatively stable religious “Middle Way” achieved by the Virgin Queen. The Reformation of the Tudor monarchs laid the foundation of the modern English religious, political, and national establishment, without which neither the history of Great Britain nor that of America would have unfolded as it did (3 credits).

HIST 410 THE FRENCH MONARCHY, 1560-1789 (WE)*
A thorough examination of the development of the political, economic, social and cultural foundations of Old Régime France: the Wars of Religion; the restoration of royal authority under Henri IV; the workings of state under Louis XIII and Richelieu; popular revolts and the Fronde; the Reign of Louis XIV and the monarchy at Versailles; the French Encyclopédie and Enlightenment; attempts at reform under Louis XV; and, the final crisis of the monarchy under Louis XVI (3 credits). 

HIST 415 THE ENGLISH CIVIL WAR AND GLORIOUS REVOLUTION: THE BIRTH OF LIBERTY
This course assesses major events in seventeenth-century England, in Europe, and in the Atlantic world, including two epic conflicts that proved pivotal to the preservation of American liberty and the development of the American Constitutional tradition, that is, the English Civil War of 1641-51 and the Glorious Revolution of 1688-89 (3 credits). 

HIST 420 EUROPE, 1700- 1830: AGE OF ENLIGHTENMENT AND REVOLUTIONS
An examination of the political, economic and social conflicts of this period, including the Enlightenment; the French Revolution; the Atlantic world; the age of Napoleon; the Congress of Vienna; comparable world revolutions; and women in revolution (3 credits). 

HIST 430 EUROPE, 1830-1914: INDUSTRIALIZATION, IDEOLOGIES, IMPERIALISM
A review the causes and consequences of the Industrial Revolution; the competing political ideologies of the nineteenth century; the origins, course and outcomes of the Revolutions of 1848; the rise of nationalism; European imperialism in Africa and Asia; nineteenth-century European culture; the role of women in nineteenth-century Europe; the state of Europe at the dawn of the twentieth century (3 credits). 

HIST 437 EUROPE, 1914-1945: WORLD WARS AND THE HOLOCAUST
The history of Europe from the First to the Second World Wars in the context of the rise of totalitarian regimes, including the political, social, economic and moral transformations wrought by these conflicts (3 credits). 

HIST 438 EUROPE: TWENTIETH-CENTURY DICTATORS
This course focuses on Hitler and the growth of Nazism; on Mussolini and Fascism; and on Lenin, Stalin, and the Communist state (3 credits). 

HIST 440: MODERN IRELAND, 1798 – 1998: THE QUEST FOR NATIONHOOD
This course explores the major trends, events, and personalities that have shaped modern Ireland from the end of the eighteenth century to the dawn of the twenty-first, from 1798 to 1998. These processes, episodes and figures include the Rebellion of 1798; Daniel O’Connell; the Great Famine; the Land War; the rise of Parnell; the 1916 Rising; the War of Independence; the foundations of Independent Ireland; and the conflict in Northern Ireland (3 credits). 

HIST 445 EUROPE, 1945-1995: FROM THE COLD WAR TO DEMOCRATIC REVOLUTIONS
A study of the origins and course of the Cold War and post-war organizations; NATO and the Atlantic Alliance; European-American diplomatic relations; the rise, decline and fall of the USSR; the issue of resurgent nationalism as a challenge to the future of the European Union (3 credits). 

HIST 446 MODERN RUSSIA, 1900-89 
Imperial background; the role of Lenin; the 1905 and 1917 revolutions; transformation of Russian institutions and society under the Soviet system; the international role of the Soviet Union; the collapse of the Soviet Union; the formation of the contemporary Russian state (3 credits). 

HIST 447 CONTEMPORARY IRISH POLITICS: NORTH AND SOUTH
An examination of the three political traditions in Ireland: constitutional nationalism, physical force republicanism, Ulster Unionism; the democratic institutions of the Irish state and Northern Ireland; political parties both North and South; the role of women in politics; the Troubles in Northern Ireland; the peace process and terrorism; economic development and the Celtic Tiger; Irish foreign policy (3 credits). 

HIST 448 MODERN FRANCE, 1789-PRESENT
The history of modern France from the French Revolution of 1789 to the present day. Focus will be placed on the social, cultural, economic, and political developments which have contributed to the making of modern France as well as the transformation of Europe and the world during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Major themes include: the French Revolution; nineteenth century social change; the realist movement; the Third Republic; French colonialism; the two World Wars; Existentialism; France in the European Union; immigration and France today (3 credits). 

HIST 449 MODERN ITALY
The history of modern Italy from its unification in the nineteenth century to the present day. Focus will be placed on the socio-economic, political, and cultural developments that have impacted 134 contemporary Italian politics and society. Major themes include the Risorgimento; the Liberal Regime; the Southern Question; Fascism and the Second World War; the economic miracle and consumer culture; post-war politics and corruption; as well as issues of identity and culture in Italy today (3 credits). 

HIST 450 HISTORY OF NEW YORK CITY
The history of New York City from its founding to the present, as an example of larger national and international processes and events, as well as the ways in which the city obtained its unique historical importance. Concentration on colonial wars; the city's role in the American Revolution; class formation; the New York City Draft Riots; immigration; and the changing nature of the city in twentieth-century America (3 credits). 

HIST 455 WOMEN IN AMERICAN HISTORY
A study of women's experiences in American history, including women's roles in historical events from the Salem witch hunts of the 1600s through the Revolutionary War; the abolitionist movement; the twentieth century; the women's movement of the 1960s; ways in which an understanding of women's history changes our understandings of American history (3 credits). 

HIST 461 WOMEN IN TWENTIETH-CENTURY EUROPE
An examination of the role of women in politics, society, and the economy throughout the twentieth century; an assessment of evolving conceptions of the role of women; the contribution of women to European culture and the arts (3 credits). 

HIST 463 CROSSING INTERNATIONAL BORDERS; WORLD MIGRATION 1800-PRESENT
From Europe and Africa to Asia and the Americas, this course takes a comparative look at the history of global migrations and discusses how they have shaped modern social and cultural identities across national borders and political divides. Introducing students to transnational approaches to the study of history, this course will discuss the impact of immigration on a host countries as well as the impact of emigration on nations of origin (3 credits). 

HIST 464 EUROPE, THE EUROPEAN UNION, AND THE MEDITERRANEAN WORLD
The first half of this course reviews the history of the European Union and examines its relations with several Mediterranean Countries. Students are introduced to the history of European reconstruction from 1945 to 2002, combined with political analysis of recent events. The class then moves to the political dynamism of EU external relations, and the various foreign and EU external policies implemented by member states. It examines various cooperation agreements and the specifics of the Euro-Mediterranean Partnership. The second half of the course provides the context of France’s relationship with various North African countries. The course will explore the development and evolution of France’s foreign policy toward North Africa. Students will focus on the various forms of cooperation that France, the European Union and the North-African countries have developed. The course will conclude with a review of French and European policies after the “Arab Spring” (3 credits).

HIST 465 SPANISH HISTORY, CULTURE AND CIVILIZATION
Contemporary Spanish perspectives are partially the result of an inherited legacy of monarchy and world supremacy during the 16th and the 17th centuries, a moment in time when the history of the world depended on the decisions of the Spanish royal court. This course will provide students with the knowledge of physical space, historical events – both good and bad – and the creative manifestations that define today´s Spain (3 credits).

HIST 466 INTERNATIONAL TERRORISM
A study of the legal and political definitions of terrorism; the causes and origins of international terrorism around the world; counterterrorism strategies and tactics; ethical dilemmas in counterterrorism; major events in the Global War on Terror; the war in Afghanistan; Operation Iraqi Freedom; international terrorist organizations such as the Irish Republican Army, FARC in Colombia, ETA in Spain, the Tamil Tigers, Al Qaeda, the Taliban, Hamas, and Hezbollah (3 credits). 

HIST 467 THE UNITED NATIONS AND INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS
This course examines major components of the United Nations in the past and present, including collective security; the origins of the United Nations; the United Nations Charter; the main organs of the United Nations; the UN and international security; UN peacekeeping; the United Nations 135 and the role of women; the UN and human rights; the UN and international development; the UN and climate change; the UN and terrorism; the UN and regional politics; the UN and arms control; the UN and international law; the UN and humanitarian relief; reform of the United Nations; and UN specialized agencies (UNESCO, WHO, World Bank) 3 credits. 

HIST 370 TOPICS IN U.S. HISTORY
An intensive study of a particular event, period, or issue. The specific subject will be available at time of registration (3 credits). 

HIST 375, 475 INTERNSHIP (3 credits each). 

HIST 376, 476 TOPICS IN GLOBAL HISTORY
An intensive study of a particular event, period, or issue. The specific subject will be available at the time of registration (3 credits). 

HIST 460 INDEPENDENT STUDY (3 credits). 

HIST 470 INDEPENDENT STUDY: HONORS (3 credits) 

HIST 495 PRACTICUM IN THE TEACHING OF HISTORY
History majors with a concentration in secondary education assist in the planning, teaching, and evaluation of the department’s introductory Core course, HIST 214. Normally open only to juniors or to seniors with permission of the chairs of History and Teacher Education (3 credits). 

HIST 496 SENIOR RESEARCH SEMINAR
This three-credit course provides a capstone experience to each history major’s undergraduate career. Students will meet in class with the seminar director and also work on a regularly scheduled basis with a specific faculty advisor. At the end of the semester, students will present their research findings to the Department of History. The goal of the senior research seminar is to showcase each history major’s mastery of historical facts, data, and interpretation in a well written major paper of 25 – 35 pages (3 credits).

(C)* May be taken to meet Core Requirements
(WE)* Writing Emphasis

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