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Course Descriptions

Writing | Literature


Writing
Fulfillment of the Core Requirement is a prerequisite for advanced writing courses. The Core Writing Sequence is expected to be completed by the end of the fourth semester at the College.

ENGL 007 FOUNDATIONAL WRITING
Foundational Writing is designed to prepare students for the successful completion of the two-course writing sequence required for the Core. In addition to helping students improve their basic reading, writing, and critical thinking skills, ENGL 007 is designed to help students master the grammatical, syntactical, and organizational skills they will need to succeed in the Core writing program. A grade of C or better is required for students to pass this course and register for Writing in Context I. (Only for students who enter the college beginning in the fall of 2012.) 1 credit

ENGL 100 ACADEMIC ENGLISH FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS (C)* This course develops the four language skills of reading, writing, listening, and speaking for English language learners. Particular competencies that will be covered include: grammar, vocabulary development, skimming, scanning, reading comprehension, thesis statement development, writing an outline, sequencing, and the 5-paragraph essay. Only for International Students. Will be used by international students to satisfy part of the college’s Core Modern Language and Literature requirement (3 credits). 

ENGL 102 ACADEMIC ENGLISH FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS II (C)*
This course is a continuation for ENGL 100, Academic English for International Students I. Students continue to practice and develop their English language writing, grammar, reading, listening and speaking, and vocabulary skills.   Students will also begin to develop the skills necessary to write analytical essays, shifting from the sentence-level focus of ENGL 100 to more advanced writing concerns. Will be used by international students to satisfy part of the college’s Core Modern Language and Literature requirement (3 credits).
 
ENGL 110 WRITING IN CONTEXT I (C)*
Writing in Context I is the first of the required two-course sequence in Core writing instruction. It provides students with the expository writing skills necessary to succeed in college. In addition, it provides them with a background in poetry, short fiction, and drama, and with the tools necessary to respond to such literature in writing. Students must pass WIC I with a C or better to become eligible to register for ENGL 120. Only for students who enter the college beginning in the fall of 2012 (3 credits).  

ENGL 120 WRITING IN CONTEXT II (C)*
The second of the required two-course sequence in writing, Writing in Context II, builds on the skills learned in ENGL 110 by providing students with the writing, critical-thinking, information literacy, and research skills necessary for success in college and in the professional world. The emphasis is on analysis, argument, and research. Students must pass this course with a grade of C or better.
Pre-requisite: ENGL 110. Only for students who enter the college beginning in the fall of 2012 (3 credits).  

ENGL 203 WRITING WORKSHOP
A sequence of writing projects combining classroom, cooperative, and independent out-of-class activities, with emphasis on effective invention, arrangement and style, and practice in data-based writing (3 credits).

ENGL 215 DIALOGUE WITH WORLD WRITERS
A course designed to foster understanding and appreciation of world writers, especially current ones, and to introduce students to different perspectives from which to write about literature (3 credits).

ENGL 217/ THTR 230 ADVANCED WRITING: NARRATIVE
A workshop process course in which students explore and develop their creativity in the writing of fiction, biography, autobiography or other narrative forms (3 credits).

ENGL 219 ADVANCED WRITING: NONFICTION
A workshop process course in which students create short pieces in contemporary non-fiction forms such as interviews, personal profiles, travel writing, science writing, reviews and commentary, and research and write a major expository article in the area of their choice. Alternate Fall semesters (3 credits).

ENGL 296 LANGUAGE AND THE INDIVIDUAL IN SOCIETY
Students explore theories of language to discover how human beings acquire and use discourse, and learn to negotiate within various discourse communities. The course also provides an introduction to semantics, stylistic techniques, and the social, mental, intellectual, political and literary functions of language (3 credits).

ENGL 300 CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP: FICTION
Workshop class in writing fiction for publication. Topic varies, and is published at time of registration. Instructors are professional writers in the genre, either on the English faculty or teaching in collaboration with them (3 credits).

ENGL 301/THTR 210 CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP: DRAMA
Workshop class in writing drama for production. Topic varies, and is published at time of registration. Instructors are professional writers in the genre, either on the English faculty or teaching in collaboration with them (3 credits).

ENGL 302 CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP: POETRY (C)*
Workshop class in writing poetry for publication. Topic varies, and is published at time of registration. Instructors are professional writers in the genre, either on the English faculty or teaching in collaboration with them (3 credits).

ENGL 304 ADVANCED WRITING: ARGUMENT
Students explore and define their positions on topics of their choosing, and research and argue their point of view orally and in writing. Ability to articulate knowledge and opinions credibly in academic writing is a primary goal; attention will be given to the public discourse of the student’s chosen field (3 credits).

ENGL 325 PROFESSIONAL WRITING
A course in transactional writing, to help students develop practical writing skills while analyzing discourses and documents from a variety of disciplines. Forms include analyses, reports, proposals, case studies, business letters and memos, resumes and letters of application (3 credits).

ENGL 400: ADVANCED CREATIVE WRITING, FICTION
A follow-up to ENGL 300: Creative Writing – Fiction This class hones the skills and practices necessary to prepare students to write and publish short stories and longer works of fiction. ENGL300: Creative Writing - Fiction is a prerequisite (3 credits).

ENGL 449 SENIOR WRITING STUDIO
A workshop to polish and hone writing skills, as the capstone of the student’s undergraduate writing portfolio. Each student will complete two papers and a proposal for future work, to demonstrate writing proficiency in the discourse of the chosen major or discipline. Required for senior writing minors (3 credits).
Prerequisite: ENGL 296 and two advanced writing courses and seniors in the English Secondary Education Track. Minimum 2.8 index in writing minor courses. 

ENGL 375, 475 INTERNSHIP (3 credits each)

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Literature
ENGL 215 DIALOGUE WITH WORLD WRITERS
A course designed to foster understanding and appreciation of world authors, especially current writers, and to introduce students to different perspectives from which to write about literature (3 credits).

ENGL 297 TOPICS IN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE I
Introduction to basic issues of language and/or literary theory, with rotating topics, to be announced at registration time (3 credits).
Prerequisite: ENGL 109 

ENGL 303 SHAKESPEARE
Exploration of selected comedies, histories, tragedies, and romances, as theatrical scripts and literary texts, in the context of Renaissance English life (3 credits).

ENGL 307 THE NOVEL
Reading and discussion of major novels from American, English, and world literature, with emphasis on developing trends. Context course, alternating with Topics courses in the genre (3 credits).

ENGL 311 SEVENTEENTH CENTURY LITERATURE
Close reading of Jonson, Donne, Milton, and other writers, against the backdrop of a culture at war with itself. Context course (3 credits).

ENGL 313 WOMEN AND LITERATURE
A study of gender issues in selected poems, short fiction, and novels, primarily by nineteenth and twentieth-century women writers (3 credits).

ENGL 314 THTR 110 DRAMA
A study of the development of Western drama from its beginnings in ancient Greece to the present. Emphasis on the literary, and theatrical aspects of representative plays, and their relation to the cultural milieu in which they were produced (3 credits).

ENGL 315-316 THE ENGLISH TRADITION IN LITERATURE
A study of the development and continuity of English literature emphasizing selected works of major writers, literary movements, and the evolution of literary forms. Required for sophomore English majors; open to non-majors with permission of instructor (3 credits each).

ENGL 317 INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY INTERPRETATION
A study of the basic skill set of an English major: close analysis, literary theory, and research methods. Required for all English majors entering in Fall 2007 and after. Open to non-majors with permission of instructor. Offered every spring (3 credits).

ENGL 318 CHAUCER
A Study of The Canterbury Tales with secondary emphasis on other works in the Chaucerian canon. Context course (3 credits).

ENGL 319 THE AGE OF SATIRE
Satire as a response to the social, political, and cultural milieu of the eighteenth century. Close reading of Dryden, Swift, Pope, Johnson, and other writers; attention paid to the birth of the English novel in works by Defoe, Fielding, and Austen. Context course (3 credits).

ENGL 320 WORLD LITERATURE (C)*
A Core curriculum Enrichment course, inviting close reading of selected texts of world renown and discussion of them in global context. Not for English credit (3 credits).

ENGL 328/ THTR 120 PLAYS IN PERFORMANCE
This course is an interactive introduction to Drama and theatre. We will use New York City theatre as our primary “textbook” --- with five of the course’s 14 evenings meeting in the city to see a range of theatre. The course is designed to explore the relationship between drama as literature and as a blueprint for performance. We will combine in-depth script analysis with an introduction to the basic theatrical arts: Acting, Directing, and design (3 credits).

ENGL 334 AMERICAN LITERATURE I: FROM THE ORIGINS THROUGH THE CIVIL WAR
Study and discussion of the development of American Literature and literary history from the early Colonial Period to the eve of the Civil War. Major topics include the complex legacy of Puritanism, the anxious state of American authorship, the modes of American individualism, and the relationship between history and cultural mythology. Required for English majors; open to non-majors with permission of instructor (3 credits).

ENGL 335 AMERICAN LITERATURE II: FROM THE CIVIL WAR UNTIL 1945
Study and discussion of the development of American Literature and literary history from the post-Civil War period through 1945. The course evaluates the origins, characteristics and interrelationships between American realism and American modernism. Required for English majors; open to non-majors with permission of instructor (3 credits).

ENGL 336 MAJOR AMERICAN WRITERS
A seminar-style class in which students will perform an in-depth analysis of several works by a single, significant American writer or works by a cluster of interrelated, significant American writers, with at least one of the writers having written after 1945. Context Course (3 credits).

ENGL 401 THE ROMANTIC AGE
Major trends of nineteenth-century romanticism, with reading and discussion of writers who shaped English literature from 1798 to 1837. Special emphasis on the revolutionary impulses that fueled the work of Wordsworth, Keats and Shelley; the role of women novelists like Radcliffe, Austen and Mary Shelley, and lesser known female poets. Context course (3 credits).

ENGL 403 THE VICTORIAN AGE
Reading and discussion of major authors in light of the mid and late nineteenth-century cultural, historical and political atmosphere. Introduction to theoretical perspectives on works by Dickens, the Brontes and the Brownings, as well as less celebrated texts. Context course (3 credits).

ENGL 417 MODERN LITERATURE I
Study and discussion of modern British, Irish, and American authors from 1890 to 1950, with emphasis on international literary movements. Context course (3 credits).

ENGL 418 MODERN LITERATURE II
Students will be introduced to major poetical movements, major playwrights, and the diverse types of novels that are part of the literary world in the West so heavily impacted by the experience of World War II, existentialism, the Beat Generation, Civil Rights movements, feminist concerns, and the early presence of multiculturalism. Context course (3 credits).

ENGL 419 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE
Study discussion of recent English language works by American, British and international authors, with emphasis on contemporary issues of multiculturalism, gender identity, the impact of mass media on literature, and the question of popular vs.” academic” writing. Context course (3 credits).

ENGL 421 TOPICS IN LITERATURE II (C)*
Close study of one or more selected authors, or of a genre or theme in literature, such as the dream vision, the millennium, or science fiction. Context course, with specific subject published at time of registration. Context course (3 credits).

ENGL 450 COORDINATING SEMINAR
An advanced seminar exploring in depth a literary topic, a single author, genre, or problem, involving several oral presentations and the submission of several papers demonstrating students’ analytical and critical abilities. Required for Senior English majors (3 credits).

ENGL 460, 461 INDEPENDENT STUDY (3 credits)

ENGL 375, 475 INTERNSHIP (3 credits each)

(C)* May be taken to meet Core Requirements 

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