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Course Description
BIOL 101 CONCEPTS OF BIOLOGY. An introduction to selected concepts in biology and the process of scientific investigation with emphasis on the human organism. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory (BIOL 102). This course may not be used as credit toward a biology major or minor.
3 credits

BIOL 111-112 GENERAL BIOLOGY. An exploration of the central concepts of cell biology, plant and animal biology, molecular biology, genetics, evolution, ecology and biodiversity. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory (BIOL 113-114).
Prerequisite for BIOL 112: BIOL 111
4, 4 credits

Biology majors must complete BIOL 111 and 112 with at least a C in order to register for additional courses in the department.

BIOL 207-208 ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY. Structure and functions of the organs and systems of the human body with expanded coverage of topics such as mechanisms of disease. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory (BIOL 209-210).
3, 3 credits

BIOL 217 GENETICS. Principles of transmission, molecular, population, and evolutionary genetics. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory (BIOL 218).
3 credits

BIOL 221 INTRODUCTORY NUTRITION. A survey of nutritional needs throughout the life cycle. Recommended for nursing, physical education, and liberal arts majors. Biology majors cannot use this course as credit toward the major. Three lectures.
3 credits

BIOL 223 ECOLOGY. Introduction to the study of the distribution, abundance and interactions of organisms and their environment. Survey of ecological principles at the level of individuals, populations, communities, and ecosystems. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory (BIOL 220).
3 credits

BIOL 211 MICROBIOLOGY AND HUMAN DISEASE. A survey of microorganisms related to human disease and the laboratory procedures employed in their identification. Two lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory (BIOL 212).
3 credits

BIOL 301 COMPARATIVE CHORDATE ANATOMY. Anatomy, physiology, and evolutionary relationships of chordates. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory (BIOL 313).
3 credits

BIOL 302 DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY. A study of cellular and molecular process underlying the development of various organisms. Emphasis will be placed on fertilization events, spatial organization, pattern formation and gene action in development. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory (BIOL 314).
3 credits

BIOL 304 INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY. Morphological and physiological characteristics of selected invertebrates and consideration of their ecological relationships. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory (BIOL 308).
3 credits

BIOL 305 PLANT SCIENCE. Physiological, biochemical and anatomical aspects of plants will be studied in the context of their native environments. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory (BIOL 303). 
3 credits

BIOL 310, 311, 410, 411 RESEARCH IN BIOLOGY. Investigation of challenging problems. Twelve hours per week including a conference with sponsor. Sponsorship by a faculty member of the Biology Department must be obtained in advance of registration.  Biology majors can apply up to 6 credits of Research toward the major.
3, 3, 3, 3 credits

BIOL319 CELL PHYSIOLOGY. Dynamic aspects of the physiology and biochemistry of the cell, including thermodynamics, oxidation/reduction, respiration, enzymes, membranes, cell signaling and metabolic pathways. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory (BIOL 323).
Prerequisite: CHEM 319
3 credits

BIOL 320 SYSTEMIC PHYSIOLOGY. A detailed examination of the physiology of the major organ systems of the human body, including digestion, respiration, cardiovascular, urinary, and reproduction, centered on the theme of homeostasis. Two lecture hours and and one three-hour laboratory (BIOL 324). 
Prerequisite: CHEM 319 or CHEM 433
3 credits

BIOL 321 MOLECULAR BIOLOGY. In-depth treatment of nucleic acid structure, information coding, transcription, translation, DNA replication, recombinant DNA technology, and other aspects of nucleic acid metabolism. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory (BIOL 322).
Prerequisites: CHEM 319, CHEM 320
3 credits

BIOL 326 ANIMAL BEHAVIOR. The biological basis of animal behavior from an ecological and evolutionary perspective. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory (BIOL 327).
3 credits

BIOL 328 FORENSIC BIOLOGY. The scientific examination of simulated crime scenes, with emphasis on the preservation of evidence; organic and inorganic analyses of physical evidence; analysis of biological evidence including hair, fingerprint, serological, and DNA samples; potential drug analysis; document and voice assessment. The accompanying laboratory will expose the students to many of the basic techniques and equipment used in a modern forensic laboratory. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory (BIOL 329).
3 credits.

BIOL 333 HUMAN PATHOPHYSIOLOGY. Understanding the underlying mechanisms of disease, the rationale for designated treatments, and the complex interrelationships between critical systems. Two lectures.
Prerequisite: BIOL 207-208
2 or 3 credits

BIOL 334 PHARMACOPHYSIOLOGY. Discussion of disease states and their treatment by pharmacological means. Special emphasis will be placed on the descriptive influence of pathology on systemic function and the use of drugs to restore balance. Two lectures.
Pre-requisites: BIOL 207-208
2 or 3 credits

BIOL 360, 460 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN BIOLOGY. Independent study of an area of biology. Ten hours per week including a conference with sponsor. Sponsorship by a faculty member of the Biology Department must be obtained in advance of registration. Biology majors can apply up to 3 credits of Independent Study toward the major.
3, 3credits

BIOL 375, 475 INTERNSHIP Placement coordinated through the Office of Career Development and Internships. Biology majors can apply up to 3 credits of Internship toward the major.
3, 3 credits

BIOL 401 HISTOLOGY. Survey of cellular structure and ultrastructure of mammalian tissues and organs. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory (BIOL 402).
3 credits

BIOL 404 BIOLOGY COLLOQUIUM. Study and discussion of biological topics and the completion of a monograph. One discussion period.
1 credit

BIOL 405 NEUROBIOLOGY. Examination of the basic principles of the nervous system including the cellular and molecular biology of the neuron, synaptic transmission, sensory and motor systems and their integration. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory (BIOL 407).
Prerequisite/Co-requisite: BIOL 319
3 credits

BIOL 406 SPECIAL TOPICS IN BIOLOGY. Current problems and studies in biology. Consult Division Director for topic. Three lectures.
3 credits

BIOL 409 MARINE AND ESTUARINE BIOLOGY. Principles of marine ecology in an oceanic and estuarine environment with emphasis on tropical and temperate communities. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory (BIOL 412).
3 credits

BIOL 416 TISSUE CULTURE. Principles and methods of animal tissue and cell culture with the emphasis on mammalian culture of cell lines and primary culture from rat tissues. The course stresses laboratory techniques including maintenance of sterility and culture conditions, use of laminar flow hood, phase contrast microscopy and photomicroscopy, preparation and contents of a variety of media, cryogenic storage of cells, indirect immunofluorescence, monoclonal antibodies, and biochemical characterizations of cell specific markers. Two hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory (BIOL 417).
3 credits

BIOL 426 IMMUNOLOGY. Study of fundamental properties of antigens and antibodies. Theories of antibody production, tolerance, transplantation, immunity, autoimmunity, tumor immunology, and immunochemistry. Introduction to antibody-mediated and cell-mediated reactions. Three lectures.
3 credits