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Course Descriptions
SOC 101 CORE: SOCIOLOGY. Introduction to the nature and scope of the science of sociology. Emphasis on societies, social structure and institutions, social groups, and on various social processes associated with social organization, socialization, and social change.
          3 credits

SOC 202 INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY. Introduction to basic concepts, aims and methods of social anthropology. A comparative examination of human cultures, past and present.
          3 credits

SOC 210 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK. The foundation of social work as a profession, its historical and philosophical development, its social purpose, value
assumptions and theoretical base. A review of the current methodologies for social work practice. Case studies, analyses of programs, policies and issues.
          3 credits

SOC 301 SOCIAL PROBLEMS. Critical analysis of causes and impact of social problems using major theoretical approaches developed in sociology. Topics include poverty, the environment, corporate power, war, racism, and health care.
          3 credits

SOC 302 RACE AND ETHNICITY. History of racial and ethnic relations in the United States analyzed in terms of sociological theories, concepts, and research findings. Critical study of patterns of intergroup relations including conflicts, discrimination, and ethnic and racial identity formation.
          3 credits

SOC 304 GLOBALIZATION AND INEQUALITY. Despite greater levels of absolute wealth, social inequality in both the United States and throughout the world is more severe than it was 40 years ago. This course explores patterns of inequality in America, patterns of inequality among nations of the globe, and also examines how processes of globalization are tied to inequality in America and the world.
          3 credits

SOC 305 URBAN SOCIOLOGY. For the first time in human history, most people are now living in urban areas.  However, the nature of cities, and the degree of urbanization still varies within the United States and throughout the world.  This course explores how cities influence the structures, cultures, and well being of societies around the globe. Additionally, it will consider how contemporary cities act as lynchpins for processes of globalization.  New York City will be used as a prominent example of both an American and global city, and consideration will be given to cities around America and the world. Field trip may be included in the course.  This course spends about 50% of its content on international issues.
          3 credits

SOC 306 THE FAMILY. The nature and structure of the family as a group and a social institution. Cross-cultural, historical and contemporary variations in family structure
and interaction. Patterns in mate selection, marriage, parenthood and divorce, and their correlations to such variables as income, ethnicity, religion and education.
          3 credits

SOC 307 RESEARCH METHODS. This course will examine the scientific method both in terms of its abstract structure and the technical details required to carry out research. Special emphasis is placed on survey research design as well as the development of a research design to actually be applied in the SOC 416, Senior Seminar. Additionally, the class will be a survey class that also provides a  comprehensive background of methodological knowledge.
Required Pre-requisite for SOC 416.
          3 credits

SOC 308 JUVENILE DELINQUENCY. Sociological perspectives on the nature, causes, and treatment of delinquency.
          3 credits

SOC 309 CRIMINOLOGY. A sociological examination and analysis of crime and theories of crime causation. Topics also include the extent of crime, types of crimes, indices of crime, and societal responses to crime.
          3 credits

SOC 310 SOCIOLOGY OF DEVIANCE. Study of stigmatized social behavior, including areas such as drug dependence, prostitution, swinging, homosexuality, and
violence. Sociological theories to explain deviance are analyzed.
          3 credits

SOC 311 INDIVIDUAL IN SOCIETY. The influence of social structure, social processes and social change on individual attitudes and behavior. Topics include
socialization and the development of self, attitude, organization and change, social influence processes and social power, group structure and processes, and the effects of
variables such as ethnicity, class, and religion on personality behavior.
          3 credits

SOC 312 SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE I. Students will be introduced to the theories used in social work practice. Issues such as helping people in crisis will also be
discussed. The focus will be on generalist practice and the different roles and methods social workers use in working with groups and communities.
          3 credits

SOC 315, 316 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY/ANTHROPOLOGY. N e w course offerings in any area of sociology. Topics will be listed in the pre-registration
booklets. Course outlines will be posted in the department before pre-registration period.
          3 credits

SOC 317 SOCIOLOGY OF DRUGS. An exploration of the use of drugs cross culturally, focusing on their political, economic, and cultural ramifications. Study of
alcohol, marijuana, and cocaine. Qualitative and quantitative data will be used in the course.
          3 credits

SOC 319 SOCIALWORK PRACTICE II. This course introduces the student to basic social work methods. Concentration in this course will be working with individuals and families. Students will learn about the helping process, starting with the initial phases, assessment, and termination.
          3 credits


SOC 324 SOCIOLOGICAL THEORIES. Survey and critical analysis of the most influential classical and contemporary sociological theories. Class readings include the work of Durkheim, Marx, Weber, Freud, and Simmel, as well as that of key figures within the theoretical perspectives of Symbolic Interactionism, Feminism, Critical Theory, and Postmodernism.
          3 credits

SOC 327 POWER AND CONFLICT. This course examines the nature of political power and the dynamics of change in the United States and around the world. It will examine theories of distribution of political power, devices used by different groups to influence social change, and alternative modes for the distribution of political power. Special emphasis will be given to the role of social movements in political and social structures.
          3 credits

SOC 328 SOCIETIES AND CULTURES OF LATIN AMERICA. A study of the native and contemporary cultures of Latin American societies from an anthropological
perspective. Analysis of the processes of socio-cultural change and the external forces affecting Latin American cultures.
          3 credits

SOC 331 WORK AND ORGANIZATIONS. Many spheres of human activity are dominated by organizational life. This course surveys complex organizations. Among the topics discussed are: organizational structure and types of organizations; organizations and technological change; organizational culture; informal processes within organizations; and how organizations interact with their environment.
          3 credits

SOC 335 CULTURE, HEALTH, AND ILLNESS. Application of anthropological and sociological methods and theory in the comparative analysis of illness, medical practices and health systems.
          3 credits

SOC 338 SCHOOLS AND SOCIETY. Examination of how schools in the United States and abroad are organized and operate, why there are class, race, and sex
differences in how much education people get, why better-educated people get the best jobs, and what must be done to reform our schools.
          3 credits

SOC 345 NEW YORK CITY ETHNIC COMMUNITIES. New York City will serve as a model for studying ethnic communities. Central sociological themes, such as
population, ethnic transition, assimilation, community structure, etc., will be studied through field visits, readings, and reports.                            
         3 credits

SOC 361 FOUNDATIONS OF JUSTICE. An analysis of the organizational and human dimensions of agencies in the administration of justice, with emphasis on the nature of law enforcement, the court system and its processes, as well as prisons and rehabilitation agencies.
          3 credits


SOC 362 ORGANIZED CRIME. Analysis of the origin, organization, control, and consequences of organized crime in the United States. Emphasis on conflicting theories
and current research, and the global face of this crime phenomenon.              
         3 credits


SOC 363 PRISONS AND PROBATION. The correctional system in relation to
punishment, treatment, and reclamation of offenders. Types of correctional institutions,
parole, and probation. Theories and methods of corrections emphasized.
          3 credits

SOC 364 CRIMINAL LAW AND SOCIETY. An exploration of the development of legal systems in different societies. Criminal law in the United States will be discussed within the context of social and political influences on its making, administration and enforcement. An underlying question to be examined: “Is law an effective form of social control?”
          3 credits

SOC 365 POLICE AND SOCIETY. A socio-historical and comparative analysis of the
structure, functions and organization of contemporary police departments. This course will address the patrol, investigative and specialized operations in policing; police discretion and decision-making; police culture and personality; police misconduct and current issues.
          3 credits

SOC 366 WHITE COLLAR CRIME. Street crimes command the attention of politicians and the mass media. But white collar crimes cost our society far more in lives
hurt and lost, and property damaged. These white collar crimes take such diverse forms as professional misconduct, deliberate industrial pollution, and governmental repression of political opponents. The course examines the content, causes, and means of controlling these various white collar crimes.     
          3 credits

SOC 369 CURRENT CONTROVERSIES IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE. Current and
controversial issues in crime and justice will be explored and analyzed in this course. The
topics will be debated in a classroom setting that will combine traditional lectures with
student presentations and full class discussions.
          3 credits

SOC 375,475 INTERNSHIP PROGRAM. Students work in agencies related to their
prospective careers (e.g., legal services, urban planning, polling bureaus, corrections,
probation offices, counseling centers, social work agencies, etc.). Students should obtain the permission of their advisor before registering for an internship and then register through the Career Services/Internships office. Six credits of internship are permitted: three credits will count for sociology major credit (SOC 375) and the other three for elective credit (SOC 475). 
          3 credits

SOC 380 LEISURE AND AMERICAN SOCIETY. Entertainment media, sports, and other forms of leisure have distinctive characteristics in American society. Topic in the course will include: the cultural evolution of leisure activities in America; the leisure class; how forms of entertainment contribute to the social debate on a number of issues; and how subcultures can form around different types of activities.
          3 credits

SOC 399 SOCIOLOGY OF GENDER. This course will include wide variety of topics and teach students to understand gender from a sociological perspective. A considerable portion of the course will be oriented toward understanding gender conceptually and theoretically. Additionally, focus will be directed to current issues of both gender in American and the international context of gender. As part of the requirement for this course, students will select their own sub-area of interest and develop further expertise through individualized course work. This course spends about 50% of its content on international issues.
          3 credits

SOC 416 SENIOR SEMINAR. The focus of this course is on a student’s development of a research paper that permits application of theoretical and methodological principles, and a presentation of their research to department majors. (WE)
Prerequisite : SOC 307 and SOC 324
          3 credits

SOC 460 INDEPENDENT STUDY. A course of study designed for students with particular research interests not covered in the department’s curriculum. Topics and
methods of research are carefully worked out by the student in consultation with the supervising professor. The course is ordinarily open only to those students who have
completed Sociology 307 and have a minimum of 3.0 GPA. Before registration, topics must be approved by the supervising professor and the department Chairperson.
          3 credits

SOC 465 RESEARCH IN SOCIOLOGY. Participation in current research projects in the department. Permission of Chairperson and supervising professor required before registration.
Prerequisite: SOC 307
          3 credits