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Course Descriptions
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

ORIENTATION/TRANSITION COURSES (CMSV)

CMSV 101 THE FIRST-YEAR EXPERIENCE. This non-credit bearing transitional course provides the student with the opportunity to acquire skills necessary for values-oriented academic success and the knowledge base necessary for personal growth and development. Students mature socially in an atmosphere that promotes positive interpersonal relationships, respect for cultural diversity, and a sense of belonging to the College community. Supportive faculty encourage critical thinking and informed decision making. Students are encouraged to explore their potential as leaders, career options, and societal responsibilities.        
0 credits

CMSV 401 THE SENIOR-YEAR EXPERIENCE. This course is designed for
Seniors and second-semester Juniors to prepare them for the transition from college to
the world of work and/or graduate school. Topics include: budget management, job
search techniques, and communication skills. Students will participate in a process of
self-assessment, reflection, and analysis of the meaning of their college experience and
how it relates to their life after college.      2 credits

NURSING COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

NURS 103 INTRODUCTION TO PROFESSIONAL NURSING. In the context of
group, students will learn the historical evolution of nursing education and practice,
communication and group dynamics, personal role development, and local and global
health care issues.        2 credits

NURS 205 HEALTH PROMOTION. This course addresses research and theories
related to the promotion of health, prevention of disease, and the maintenance of health for individuals, families, and communities. The focus is on strategies to enhance wellness
across the lifespan.
 2 credits

NURS 209 THEORETICAL AND RESEARCH FOUNDATIONS OF NURSING.
The development of a theoretically-based research approach to health care and the
practice of nursing is the focus of discussion. The research process and major theoretical
frameworks from nursing and related disciplines are explored.
3 credits

NURS 300 SPECIAL TOPICS IN NURSING. New course offerings in any area of
nursing. Topics are listed in the registration book. Descriptions of specific topics are
posted in the Nursing Department. Specific requirements will depend on topic.
1-3 credits

NURS 315 INTRODUCTION TO THE CARE OF THE ADULT AND AGING CLIENT.  This course concentrates on the needs of patients in a variety of health care settings where direct nursing care is provided.  Course content is applied to both simulated and actual patient situations.  This is the first nursing practice experience where theoretical content in prior courses is integrated with the application of basic care concepts.  The course continues with the introduction of major medical surgical concepts which address conditions/needs of adults and the aging.  The focus is on the individual as a patient within the context of the family and community.  Psychological aspects and their relationships to physiological processes and diseases are explored.  Nursing care for individuals with alterations in health that affect the respiratory, gastrointestinal and immunological systems is emphasized, along with a focus on perioperative care.  Four hours of theory and twelve hours of field/lab experience for fourteen weeks.
Prerequisites: BIO 207-208, 211 (BIOL 333 may be taken concurrently);
CHEM 105-106 or 101-102
Corequisites: NURS 103,309       
8 credits

NURS 309 HEALTH ASSESSMENT. This course is designed to introduce students to
obtaining and recording individual comprehensive database that includes both health history and physical examination. Emphasis is on differentiating students between normal and abnormal findings. Experiences in the college skills lab will assist the student in synthesizing the components of the health history and physical assessment findings. Two hours of theory and three hours of lab experience for the semester.
3 credits

NURS 324 NURSING CARE OF THE ADULT AND AGED.  An introduction of major concepts, which address acute and chronic medical-surgical problems/needs of adults and the aging.  The focus is on the individual as a client within the context of their family and community.  Psychological aspects and their relationship to physiological processes and diseases are explored.  Nursing care for the individuals with alterations in health that affect fluid and electrolytes, and the integumentary, cardiovascular, neurovascular, endocrine, immune, skeletal, neurological, sensory, and the renal systems is emphasized.  Clinical practice experiences are provided primarily in acute and chronic care settings as well as rehabilitation sites.   Four hours of theory and twelve hours of field experience for fourteen weeks.
Prerequisites: NURS 103,315,309, PSYC 320
Corequisites: BIOL 334; NURS 209
8 credits

NURS 402 PROCESS OF LEADERSHIP IN NURSING. Senior level course in
which students clarify their individual philosophy of nursing in light of the CMSV
Philosophy. The students identify their responsibility for leadership within the health
care delivery system. Ideological, social, political, legal, economic, and cultural
influences on the health care delivery system will be explored. Change, communication,
group, research and leadership theory will provide the student with the background to
assume professional responsibility in the delivery of health care. This course is taken in
the first semester (Fall) of Senior year.
Corequisites: NURS 431, 433, 409
    2 credits

NURS 409 LIFE CYCLE. The focus of Life Cycle is on nursing care of different
aggregates across the life span with an emphasis on chronicity and rehabilitation.
Clinical experiences will be provided in a variety of community-based facilities,
including sub-acute and rehabilitation agencies. Three hours of theory and six hours of
clinical weekly. For R.N. students.
Prerequisite: NURS 309
5 credits

NURS 431 NURSING CARE OF THE FAMILY I (MATERNITY NURSING).
Major concepts are presented which address needs/problems of families with the focus
on assisting them to maintain, restore, and promote health and well being. Physical and
psychological alterations in health, which affect families, are discussed, as they relate
to childbearing concepts. Clinical practice experiences are provided in hospital and
community-based facilities that reflects the content area. Four hours theory and twelve
hours of field/lab experience for 7 weeks.
Prerequisites: NURS 322, BIOL 334, PSYC 319
4 credits

NURS 433 NURSING CARE OF THE FAMILY II (PEDIATRIC NURSING).
Major concepts are presented which address needs/problems and development of
children and their families with the focus on assisting them to maintain, restore and
promote health and well being. Physical and psychological alterations in health,
which affect children and their families, are discussed, as they relate to child rearing
concepts. Clinical practice experiences are provided in hospital and community
based facilities that reflect the content area. Four hours of theory and twelve hours
of field lab experience for 7 weeks.
Prerequisites NURS 322, BIOL 334, PSYC 319
4 credits

NURS 434 NURSING CARE OF THE COMMUNITY I (PSYCHIATRIC NURSING). Major concepts are presented which address needs/problems of families with the focus on assisting them to maintain, restore and promote mental health and well being. Psychological alterations in health, which affect families, are discussed. Clinical practice experiences are provided in mental health nursing across the life span in hospitals and the community. Four hours of theory and twelve hours of field/lab time for 5 weeks.
Prerequisites:  NURS431, NURS433
3 credits

NURS 436 NURSING CARE OF THE COMMUNITY II (COMMUNITY NURSING).  A population focus is used to target the specific needs of aggregates. The role of the nurse in caring for a community is explored as it builds upon prior individual and family experiences. Clinical experiences will be provided in a variety of community-based facilities. Four hours theory and twelve hours clinical for 5 weeks.
Prerequisites: NURS 431, NURS 433
3 credits

NURS 440 PRECEPTORSHIP. This course offers a concentrated four-week experience, which emphasizes transition from the student role to the graduate role. The clinical settings that are used to provide a realistic environment in which to: test and clarify a philosophy of nursing practice, identify clinical knowledge gaps, integrate relevant nursing research, evaluate one’s own impact on the collaborative process within the health care team, and initiate a plan for self-growth. Last four weeks of final semester; 8 hours for 18 shifts or 12 hours for 12 shifts for a total of 144 hours.
Prerequisites: NURS 434, 436
3 credits

NURS 460 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN NURSING. Independent study is the pursuit
within diverse community settings of a special topic or project by a student under the
guidance of a faculty member. This course combines a research focus with an
opportunity to integrate previous learning and apply it to the study of some elected area
of interest in nursing. It provides the students with an opportunity to assume more
responsibility for their own learning and to share projects and individual studies with
peers and faculty through seminar. In addition, this course fosters creativity, autonomous
decision making, independence, and self-direction.
1-4 credits